Wednesday, 30 November 2011

The Daily Teaser: Saint Andrew’s Day — 30-11-2011

You know, I’ve GOT to admit, blue
is definitely the colour, at the moment.

Well …

It IS on the Saint Andrew’s cross.

And me, as well.

Frankly … ?

I’ve got to admit, joblessness really bit’s, this time of year, in the build up to Christmas.

If the news broadcasts aren’t talking about the public sector strike … ? Then they’ve been talking about Cyber Monday, Black Friday, what-have-you.

Oh, well …

At least I’ve managed to get Jude his pressie, so that’s something!

Let’s get moving on, shall we … ?

»»·««

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi putting her answers: and, along with mentioning her YouTube appearance, also bagged 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s themed questions, shall we … ? Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video
Q1) 30th November is Saint Andrew’s Day: name either of the two Eastern European countries that Saint Andrew is a patron of?

Q2) Which east coast port is known as the Granite City?

Q3) Which Scottish city famously holds an annual Arts Festival?

Q4) Which Isle was linked to the mainland by a bridge in 1995?

Q5) Which islands give their name to ponies and wool?

Q6) Which small Caribbean Island celebrates Saint Andrew’s Day, after gaining its independence on 30th November, 1966?

Q7) Moving on … 30th November, 1886, saw the The Folies Bèrgere hold it’s first revue: what does the word Bergère translate as … ?

Q8) 30th November, 1968, saw the introduction of which trades legislation in the UK … ?

Q9) 30th November, 2005, saw the Right Reverend John Sentamu named as the Church of England’s first black archbishop: is he the 97th, 98th or 99th Archbishop of York … ?

Q10) And finally … 30th November, 1995, saw the official end of which Operation … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 29th November, 1877, saw Thomas Edison demonstrate the first phonograph: were the records on that phonograph circular, cylindrical or spherical?
A1) Cylindrical.

Q2) 29th November, 1999, saw a power-sharing executive set up in which part of the UK … ?
A2) Northern Ireland.

Q3) More to the point, how many constituent nations make up the UK … ?
A3) Four: although technically, the UK’s made up of two nations, — England and Scotland — a principality — Wales — and a province: Northern Ireland, itself.

Q4) 29th November, 1895, saw the birth of which noted director and choreography … ?
A4) Busby Berkely.

Q5) 29th November. 1972, saw the release of the world’s first commercially successful video game: what was it … ?
A5) Pong.

Q6) And finally … 29th November, 1944, saw the liberation of which East European country, towards the end of World War 2?
A6) Albania.
Enjoy those, everyone: I’ll catch you later.

After I’ve left you with the Tune appropriate to the day …

Tuesday, 29 November 2011

Monsters Blood, guts, and an impressively Low budget


Hmmm …

No, seriously.

Hmmmmm.

With possibly extra mmm

He says.

You know, all these ‘Hmmm’ noises are possibly leaving you wondering what I’ve put in my cocoa.

Milk and sugar, to be perfectly frank.

Well, milk, sugar and cocoa powder.

Oh, and hot water, but that should be obvious …

‹‹•››

But outside of cocoa … ?

The reason for the assorted, thoughtful, Hmmmmm noises is the film I’ve just watched.

The recent released on DVD, 2010, low budget Brit-flick that is Monsters.

And I have to confess, I’m none too sure if I’ve seen a work that’s wasted my evening, the science-fictional offspring of Apocalypse Now and District 9, a student piece done on a laptop …

Or a work of complete genius …

‹‹•››

Monsters sees Scoot McNairy as Andrew, a cynical photojournalist ordered to get his boss’ daughter — Sam, played by Whitney Able — out of Mexico.

The twist, here, is that not only have both Andrew and Sam lost their passports, and have to deal with nervous locals, and corrupt officials …

But that the Earth has been infested — yes, infested is the right word, here, I think — by the monsters of the title: giant creatures that resemble the glow-in-the-dark mutant offspring of octopi and spiders.

And they’ve been given some 48 hours to get to The Wall — the giant barrier that the US government has put up, between its territory, and the infested areas of the borders — before the next set of bombing runs …

‹‹•››

Now …

Work of genius, or waste of time … ?

I really am STILL not sure … ! And that’s some 40 minutes or so after actually finishing watching Monsters.

On the whole, I’m more inclined to say Monsters is definitely NOT a waste of time: although whether it’s a work of genius, I don’t know.

Well …

That’s not entirely fair.

I do know that — from reading both the IMDb and Wikipedia entries — that director, writer and special effects man for the film, Gareth Edwards shot Monsters mostly in Central America. With only Scoot McNairy and Whitney Able as his only two professional cast members, I should add here.

What’s more, he SHOT it, quite literally, on digital cameras, using a laptop to do the editing, and flash drives to transport the rushes.

I have to admit, that — and the fact that the budget looks like it was the leftover tea-club* money from Avatarleft me SERIOUSLY impressed.

To be frank … ?

Monsters isn’t a ‘Wham, Bam, Thanking YOU, Ma’am’ film: don’t watch it, if that’s what you’re expecting or wanting.

But I AM convinced you’ll see a film that’s certainly and seriously watchable!
Monsters

★★








* Just so Debbi, Nina, Mr Strict and the rest of the off-shore Hard Squad know, a tea-club is usual in the workplace, here in the UK: it’s usually where everyone clubs together to buy a BIG box of teabags, some milk and sugar. Mugs and spoons are, of course, an optional extra …

The Daily Teaser — 29-11-2011

Now, THAT’S a frustration, that REALLY is … !

You’ve probably worked out I’m something of a Mac fan, haven’t you, over the years.

And USUALLY, I’m also happy to recommend Safari, the Mac’s default browser, to people.

I happen to like the way it interacts with most sites, Blogger in particular.

However — and I know I’ve mentioned this, before now — the changes Apple introduced in the Safari’s 5·1 update, make USING it seriously tricky: it’s taking its own good time rendering pages, despite repeated reloads.

To give you an example … ?

I’ve just spent 50 minutes setting up writing today’s post.

Compared to the usual 20.

Most of THAT has been spent waiting for Safari to STOP acting like a twerp … !

Lets get moving on, shall we … ?

Before I’m tempted to get really vernacular!

»»·««

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi — all on her ownsome — putting her answers: and, on top of now being a star of YouTube, she managed to bag 5 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we? Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video

Q1) 29th November, 1877, saw Thomas Edison demonstrate the first phonograph: were the records on that phonograph circular, cylindrical or spherical?

Q2) 29th November, 1999, saw a power-sharing executive set up in which part of the UK … ?

Q3) More to the point, how many constituent nations make up the UK … ?

Q4) 29th November, 1895, saw the birth of which noted director and choreography … ?

Q5) 29th November. 1972, saw the release of the world’s first commercially successful video game: what was it … ?

Q6) And finally … 29th November, 1944, saw the liberation of which East European country, towards the end of World War 2?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 28th November, 1095, saw Pope Urban 2nd formally name the leaders of what: the First Crusade, the Jesuits, or the Franciscan order … ?
A1) The First Crusade.

Q2) 28th November saw 11 people attacked by a mentally ill young man in a church in Croydon: but in which year of the 1990s … ?
A2) 1999.

Q3) 28th November, 1660, saw the founding of the Royal Society: what’s its full name … ?
A3) The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge.

Q4) More to the point, how was it known, before it was founded … ?
A4) The Invisible College.

Q5) 28th November saw the first broadcasts of what’s now the Grand Ole Opry: in which US city …?
A5) Nashville.

Q6) And finally … 28th November, 1814, saw which British paper become the first to be printed by automatic presses?
A6) The Times.
Enjoy those, everyone: after I’ve left you with the divine Ms Sutherland …

Monday, 28 November 2011

The Daily Teaser — 28-11-2011

There we go.

And I’ll be frank, I just couldn’t resist putting up this photo of my nephew, Jude.

Looking as innocent as ANYTHING, I should add, despite — yesterday — having learnt a new game.

Of Let’s Try To Stick This Fridge Magnet To Uncle Paul’s Forehead*.

Let’s get moving on, shall we … ?

Yes, let’s.

»»·««

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi putting her answers: and, along with putting in this post on how to deal with Blue and Red Meaniesª, also bagging 6 out of 6.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we? Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video

Q1) 28th November, 1095, saw Pope Urban 2nd formally name the leaders of what: the First Crusade, the Jesuits, or the Franciscan order … ?

Q2) 28th November saw 11 people attacked by a mentally ill young man in a church in Croydon: but in which year of the 1990s … ?

Q3) 28th November, 1660, saw the founding of the Royal Society: what’s its full name … ?

Q4) More to the point, how was it known, before it was founded … ?

Q5) 28th November saw the first broadcasts of what’s now the Grand Ole Opry: in which US city …?

Q6) And finally … 28th November, 1814, saw which British paper become the first to be printed by automatic presses?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 27th November, 176AD, saw Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius give his son which rank … ?
A1) Imperator.

Q2) More to the point, which son … ?
A2) Commodus.

Q3) 27th November, 2005, saw the first performance of what kind of transplant, in Amiens, France … ?
A3) Partial face transplant.

Q4) 27th November, 1978, saw the founding of the militant PKK: or Kurdish Workers Party. In which country … ?
A4) Turkey.

Q5) 27th November, 1940, saw the birth of Bruce Lee: what name was he born under … ?
A5) Lee Jun-fan. (Or 李振藩, if you’re up to Cantonese … without a safety net … )

Q6) And finally … 27th November, 1942, saw the birth of Jimi Hendrix: what was his first UK hit … ?
A6) Hey Joe.
Enjoy those, everyone: I’ll catch you later … !




















* First sign of an enquiring mind, I think: Jude’s clicked that fridge magnets stick to things. Heº spent most of yesterday — at the weekly family dinner — trying to stick a Jeep-shaped fridge-magnet to my forehead … and doors … and door-jambs …

º He knows it sticks to fridges, already: that’s were he pulled it from …

ª Oh, I know it, Debbi, I’m not THAT young: but I only Yellow Submarine through TV repeats, when I was about 12. So it’s been YEARS, since I’ve seen it: probably be worth looking it up!
And you’re now on YouTube … ? What was the name of that colloquium, again … ? :D

Sunday, 27 November 2011

The Daily Teaser — 27-11-2011

Hmmm …

That’s something …

I’ve got to confess, I’ve got Radio 4 on, in the background, this morning: I’m feeling civilised, frankly, and Radio 4’s usually very civilised of a Sunday.

But they’ve just had the news on: and from what they’ve said?

It sounds like Britain’s Ministry of Defense knew more about the faults of the Snatch Landrover than they’re letting on.

Which could prove embarrassing for someone.

After all, the Snatch has been implicated in a death or two in Afghanistan.

Let’s get moving on, shall we … ?

‹‹•››

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi and Mr Strict putting in their answers: with Debbi* bagging 5 out of 5, and Mr Sª bagging 4.

Let’s see how they — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we? Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video

Q1) 27th November, 176AD, saw Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius give his son which rank … ?

Q2) More to the point, which son … ?

Q3) 27th November, 2005, saw the first performance of what kind of transplant, in Amiens, France … ?

Q4) 27th November, 1978, saw the founding of the militant PKK: or Kurdish Workers Party. In which country … ?

Q5) 27th November, 1940, saw the birth of Bruce Lee: what name was he born under … ?

Q6) And finally … 27th November, 1942, saw the birth of Jimi Hendrix: what was his first UK hit … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 26th November, 1922, saw Howard Carter enter the tomb of King Tut-Ankh-Amon: where in Egypt was Tut-Ankh-Amon’s tomb … ?
A1) The Valley of the Kings.

Q2) More to the point, who sponsored Carter’s excavation’s of the tomb … ?
A2) George Edward Stanhope Molyneux Herbert: better known as the 5th Earl of Carnarvon.

Q3) 26th November, 1863, saw which US president announced the formal celebration of Thanksgiving … ?
A3) President Abraham Lincoln.

Q4) 26th November, 1992, saw the British PM announce in Parliament that the Queen would become the first British Monarch to be taxed since the 1930s: which British PM announced this… ?
A4) John Major.

Q5) And finally … 26th November, 1998, saw Tony Blair become the first British PM to address the Parliament of where … ?
A5) The Republic of Ireland.
Enjoy those, everyone: I’ll catch you later.

After I’ve left you with a few wise words from birthday boy, Mr Skinner …











* Blue Grass, Debbi … ? Yes, I know it’s a style of music native to Kentucky … But I’ve ALWAY’S wondered about it …

ª The Egypt Exploration Society, Derek … ? I THINK that’s just got you promoted to Big Beast!

Saturday, 26 November 2011

Merlin Episode 8 Series 4: Lancelot du Lac.

Oh, now, hang ON … !

Hubba, hubba!

Sorry, I‘m definitely getting not just impressed, there.

I think I’m getting ENTHUSIASTIC … !

No, seriously … !

Oh, LORDY, yes … !

You see, I’ve just seen tonight’s 8th episode of Merlin, series 4.

And I think I’ve fallen in love … !

‹‹·››

OK …

Maybe that’s getting a touch carried away.

But I’ve got to admit to having sat meself down with tonight’s episode — Lancelot du Lac — and coming away seriously impressed with it.

Lancelot du Lac sees Morgana’s evil plans being unintentionally given a step forward, with Arthur’s own (unknowing) help.

Arthur — Bradley James — finally takes the big step of asking Guinevere — Angel Coulby — to marry him.

That piece of news … ? Is EXACTLY the sort of thing Morgana wants to hear. It gives her the excuse to bringing Guinevere’s former swainº, Sir Lancelot*, back from the dead.

AND makes sure that he has a small bracelet to give to Guinevere, guaranteeing that her buried feelings for the handsome knight will re-surface.

They do.

And while both Merlin and Gaius have realised that the Lancelot that’s walking around, causing havoc, is the shade of the man they remember, there’s little they can do to stop the inevitable — and apparent — betrayal.

‹‹•››

Now …

I said about enthusiastic … ?

Oh, LORD, yes … !

Episode 8 really DID seem to re-tell part of the Arthurian myth — that of Guinevere’s betrayal of her husband — in a way that was both wonderfully written, stunning performed: with genuine human emotion from it’s central characters, I should add, Bradley James as Arthur, and Angel Coulby as Guinevere.

And ALL together stunning viewing.

If you get the chance to watch … ?

I think you’d be well repaid …










* Reprised, again, by Santiago Cabrera.

º Did I just use the word ‘SWAIN’ in an otherwise innocent post … ? Dear GODS, somebody STOP me … !!

The Daily Teaser — 26-11-2011

Bleugh …

Says I …

Very much in the awareness that I’m feeling contradictory: certainly after yesterday.

Remember me saying I forgetting to put my alarm on … ?

Will, I didn’t, last night.

My eyeballs feel like they’s a BIT on the bleary side, lets put it that way and gently get moving on.

Before I have to put them back in their sockets with a teaspoon …

»»•««

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi* — all on her ownsome, bless her — putting in her answers, AND managing to bag 7 out of 7.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with todays questions, shall we? Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, License and video
Q1) 26th November, 1922, saw Howard Carter enter the tomb of King Tut-Ankh-Amon: where in Egypt was Tut-Ankh-Amon’s tomb … ?

Q2) More to the point, who sponsored Carter’s excavation’s of the tomb … ?

Q3) 26th November, 1863, saw which US president announced the formal celebration of Thanksgiving … ?

Q4) 26th November, 1992, saw the British PM announce in Parliament that the Queen would become the first British Monarch to be taxed since the 1930s: which British PM announced this… ?

Q5) And finally … 26th November, 1998, saw Tony Blair become the first British PM to address the Parliament of where … ?
And here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 25th November, 2011 will see a partial eclipse of what take place: the sun or the moon?
A1) The Sun.

Q2) This eclipse will mostly occur over which continent?
A2) Antarctica. (It should ALSO be visible from New Zealand, and — in theory — to Port Elizabeth, in South Africa: although not very visible)

Q3) 25th November, 1973, saw the military head of government in which country overthrown?
A3) Greece.

Q4) 25th November, 1952, saw the first performance of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. In which London theatre is it currently housed … ?

Q5) 25th November, 1985, saw the recording of the original version of Band Aid’s Do They Know It’s Christmas: which former Boomtown Rat organised this recording … ?
A5) Sir Bob Geldof.

Q6) In which London area was this: Notting Hill, Kensington Gardens or Bankside … ?
A6) Notting Hill.

Q7) And finally … 25th November, 1914 saw the birth of Joe DiMaggio: with which team did he spend his career?
A7) The New York Yankees.
Enjoy those, everyone …

I’ll catch you later …












* I’ve got to admit, Debbi, that’s the first time I’ve come across the phrase, Red Meanies: you learn something new, every day. Although didn’t I read, somewhere, that John Lennon was a fan of Capote’s … ?

Friday, 25 November 2011

Psycho: Because, sometimes, you just HAVE to watch that First One … !

Which is definitely a long title, I know …

But it’s also one that I feel is — vaguely — justified.

You see, I was an impressionable teen during the 1980s, when quite a few horror films were what’s now called Slasher films.

You know the sort of thing.

Usually they featured a small group of teenagers, all on their own, somewhere out in the sticks and getting killed off — one at a time and incredibly messily — by a deranged nutter in a mask.

Or featured a small group of teenagers, all on their own, somewhere out in the sticks and getting killed off — one at a time and incredibly messily — by a deranged nutter with hideous facial scaring.

Ultimately … ?

I’m thinking a LOT of those Slasher flicks were — very loosely — derived from Tobe Hooper’s original Texas Chainsaw Massacre, complete with small group of teens, isolated area and — guess what? — deranged nutter in a mask.

Now, don’t quote me.

But I’m pretty sure Hooper said somewhere he had one killer in mind, when he made Texas Chainsaw Massacre: and THAT was Ed Gein.

But I have to confess, I had little to do, to night.

Except watch a film I’d recorded a couple of days ago.

One that’s still spoken of with a certain amount of reverence, today.

One that saw a certain Mr Hitchcock turn in one of his best known films, and features a central character, again, derived from Ed Gein.

A film and character that made a certain made Anthony Perkins’ career.

Psycho

‹‹•››

26/11/2011

Psycho — based on the 1959, Robert Bloch novel of the same name — sees Janet Leigh as Marion Crane leaving work early, one day, after emptying her bosses safe of $40, 000.

And … ?

After having an encounter with a highway patrolman, and trading her car in for a new one, arriving at the out-of-the-way Bates Motel: run, or course, by Anthony Perkins’ incredibly twitchy performance as Norman Bates.

The worrying thing about chéz Bates … ?

Is the state of the bathroom: and it’s owners AUDIBLE arguments with his mostly unseen mother.

‹‹•››

Now, there is possibly TONS I could be saying about Psycho, there REALLY is.

For STARTERS, the the 1998 remake really doesn’t cut the mustard: at least, as far as I’m concerned. (I’ll be honest, I did try watching it: Vince Vaughan, much as I generally like the man’s style, had me turning the remake distinctly off.)

But Hitchcock’s 1960 original?

Well …

I think you really can’t beat the film the spawned a genre.

And think Pyscho is that film …





Dear Mr Clegg ...

Hmmm ...

You know, I've got to admit, I'm actually writing this post from Brentwood Library.

Or started it, there, I may finish it, back indoor.

But I'm trying to at least get out of the house and do some exercise, each day.

Doctor's orders and all of that ... !

‹‹•››

But at ANY rate ... ?

At any rate, I thought I'd quickly highlight this news item from the BBC.

Just to summerise, Britain's Deputy Prime Minister - and leader of the Liberal Democrat half of Britain's coalition government -has announced a scheme to use one billion pounds to help assorted youngster back into employement.

Or, at least, help employers pay them.

I'll happily admit, it's a very worthy scheme, it really is.

On the downside, though ... ?

On the downside is the simple practical question I'd like to ask him.

Where's the equivalent billion of public money, for the older unemployed people, like me, who are ALSO finding it tough to get a job?

I really do HATE to sound selfish, I really do.

But I think I'd like an answer, there.

The Daily Teaser — 25-11-2011

Arrrrgh … !

I HATE that when that happens … !

I should explain, shouldn’t I … ?

I hate it when I’ve quite simply forgotten to turn my alarm clock on … !

I’m a control freak, I’ll admit it: I don’t mind waking up that late, if I’ve set me alarm for it.

But, BOY, do I end up kicking myself, if I completely forget … !

Grrrrrrr … !

Let’s get moving on, shall we … ?

Yes, let’s …

‹‹•››

Yesterday’s Teaser saw Debbi — all on her ownsome, but feeling rather pleased she DIDN’T over do the turkey — putting in her answers: AND bagging 6 out of 7*.

Let’s see how she — and you — do with today’s questions, shall we? Here they are, along with the ‘How To’, Licence and video
Q1) 25th November, 2011 will see a partial eclipse of what take place: the sun or the moon?

Q2) This eclipse will mostly occur over which continent?

Q3) 25th November, 1973, saw the military head of government in which country overthrown?

Q4) 25th November, 1952, saw the first performance of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. In which London theatre is it currently housed … ?

Q5) 25th November, 1985, saw the recording of the original version of Band Aid’s Do They Know It’s Christmas: which former Boomtown Rat organised this recording … ?

Q6) In which London area was this: Notting Hill, Kensington Gardens or Bankside … ?

Q7) And finally … 25th November, 1914 saw the birth of Joe DiMaggio: with which team did he spend his career?
Here’s yesterday’s questions and answers …
Q1) 24th November, 1859, saw the original publication of On the Origin Of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, by Charles Darwin: on which ship did Darwin famously travel, during the 1830s … ?
A1) The HMS Beagle.

Q2) More to the point, who was the book published by … ?
A2) Publishers, John Murray of Albemarle Street London.

Q3) As a final Darwin question … which potter was Darwin famously related to, on his mother’s side … ?
A3) Josiah Wedgewood.

Q4) 24th November, 2005, saw the UK introduce 24-hour licensing: who was British Prime minister, at the time … ?
A4) Tony Blair.

Q5) 24th November, 1941, saw the USA extend Lend-Lease aid to whom: the Free French, the UK or the Irish Free State?
A5) The Free French.

Q6) 24th November is celebrated as Lachit Divas: in which Indian state … ?
A6) Assam.

Q7) And finally … 24th November, 1974, saw the discovery of Lucy, an Australopithecus afarensis skeleton: in which African country … ?
A7) Ethiopia.
And here’s the Friday question set for struggling pub quiz-masters: covered, as ever, by the usual Creative Commons License
Online 130
ROUND ONE. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Q1) How old was the Queen, on her birthday in 2006?
A1) 80.

Q2) Oxfam is actually short for what?
Q2) Oxford Committee for Famine Relief.

Q3) What is the name of the Israeli Parliament?
A3) The Knesset.

Q4) Saint Stephen’s Day is more commonly known as what?
A4) Boxing Day

Q5) Octavia Hill founded which national organisation, in 1895?
A5) The National Trust.

Q6) Grand Lodges and Grand Orients are the head offices of various European branches of what?
A6) The Freemasons.

Q7) Who made a last gasp move from Arsenal to Chelsea, just before the August 31st transfer deadline, in 2006?
A7) Ashley Cole.

Q8) How many members does the US Senate have?
A8) 100.

Q9) The Camorra of Naples is a branch of which organisation?
A9) The Mafia.

Q10) Who will King, if Prince Charles dies before the Queen?
A10) Prince William.



ROUND TWO. THREE COLOUR’S BLACK.

Q11) Edward Teach was better known as which sea–going historical figures?
A11) Blackbeard.

Q12) What name is given to a stellar object that light cannot escape from?
A12) A Black hole.

Q13) Which famously dark figure plays a key role in the state opening of Parliament?
A13) Black Rod.

Q14) What’s the name of Henry Rollins’ famously hard–core punk band?
A14) Black Flag.

Q15) During the 1970s, Black September, the Palestinian paramilitary group, were responsible for a massacre at the Olympic Games. But in which German city was it held? (Bonus point for the German name)
A15) Munich (München)

Q16) Which comedy actor appeared in School of Rock, and the Peter Jackson version of King Kong?
A16) Jack Black

Q17) Which hip-hop band had a huge hit with Pump It and Where is Love?
A17) The Blacked Eyed Peas

Q18) Black Hawk Down was a film about the Battle of Mogadishu. Who was its director?
A18) Ridley Scott.

Q19) A Black Susan is type of which flower?
A19) A sunflower.

Q20) What’s the name of Susan Hill’s classic ghost story?
A20) The Woman in Black.



ROUND THREE. MONEY IN THE BANK.

Q21) 19th October, 1987, was known how, by the business community?
A21) Black Monday.

Q22) Asda are owned by which US giant?
A22) Wal–Mart.

Q23) What’s the US equivalent of the Financial Times?
A23) The Wall Street Journal.

Q24) What do American’s call a current account?
A24) A checking account.

Q25) The Bündesbank is the Central bank of which European country?
A25) Germany.

Q26) Jessops made their name retailing what electrical item?
A26) Camera’s.

Q27) Scott Adams’ business cartoons are now a major business, in their own right: what are they called?
A27) Dilbert.

Q28) What was the currency of Italy, prior to the introduction of the Euro?
A28) The Lira.

Q29) True or False: McDonald’s owns one third of sandwich chain, Prêt A Manger
A29) True.

Q30) What was the pre–decimal value of a guinea?
A30) £1 and 1 shilling. (£1•05p, in modern money.)



ROUND 4. MUSIC, AND LIGHTS.

Q31) Which teenage girl band shared its name with an Egyptian queen?
A31) Cleopatra.

Q32) Which respected bluesman was born was christened as McKinley Morganfeld?
A32) Muddy Waters.

Q33) Graeme McPherson is better known as which member of Madness?
A33) Lead singer and Radio 2 DJ, Suggs.

Q34) How many girls are in Alisha’s Attic?
A34) 2.

Q35) Colonel Tom Parker was the manager of which star?
A35) Elvis Presley.

Q36) True or False. Was Blind Willie Jefferson a genuine bluesman?
A36) False. (His name was actually Blind LEMON Jefferson)

Q37) Vanessa Mæ plays which musical instrument? (Bonus point for telling us how many strings that instrument has.)
A37) The violin.

Q38) Wendy James was the lead singer for which band?
A38) Transvision Vamp.

Q39) Who sang Babouska and Wuthering Heights?
A39) Kate Bush.

Q40) Alanis Morrisette is from which country?
A40) Canada.



ROUND 5. AT THE MOVIES.

Q41) Which Disney film featured songs called The Circle of Life and Hakuna Mutata?
A41) The Lion King.

Q42) Susan Sarandon played a nun in which film?
A42) Dead Man Walking.

Q43) Complete the following title: Teenage Mutant Ninja … what?
A43) Turtles.

Q44) In which film did Nigel Hawthorne play an English monarch?
A44) The Madness of King George.

Q45) How many James Bond films did George Lazenby star in?
A45) 1.

Q46) Anthony Hopkins played which US president?
A46) Richard Nixon.

Q47) Which 1993 Spielberg film is largely shot in black and white?
A47) Schindler’s List.

Q48) Which Bond film shares its name with Ian Fleming’s Jamaican home?
A48) Goldeneye.

Q49) Which was the first Oliver Stone film about Vietnam? (Bonus point for one of the others.)
A49) Platoon, in 1986. (The other two were Born on the Fourth of July, in 1989, and Heaven and Earth, in 1993.)

Q50) In the film of the same name, who played Buster?
A50) Phil Collins.



ROUND SIX. GENERAL IGNORANCE.

Q51) In the most common form of colour blindness, two colours are usually confused: name one of them. (Two points for both.)
A51) Red and Green.

Q52) Which Abba LP was Number 1, in 1999, seven years after its original release?
A52) Abba Gold.

Q53) Which entrepreneur owns the Ritz, in Paris?
A53) Mohammed Al-Fayed.

Q54) Which stately home and safari park are owned by the Marquis of Bath?
A54) Longleat.

Q55) Former Tory MP, the late Alan Clarke one famously said “Only domestic servants” … what: apologise, bow or do the vacuum cleaning?
A55) Apologise

Q56) What kind of animal can be Texel or Romney Marsh?
A56) Sheep.

Q57) The Bee Gees were born on which island?
A57) The Isle of Mann.

Q58) Theatre impresario, Bill Kenwright, is connected with which football club?
A58) Everton.

Q59) What was Jemima Khan’s maiden name?
A59) Jemima Goldsmith.

Q60) How many popes were there, in 1978? (Bonus point for naming one of them.)
A60) Three. Paul the 6th, John Paul 1st, John Paul 2nd.
Enjoy those, everyone: I’ll catch you later …

After I’ve left you with my favourite Black-Eyed Peas tune … !








* Actually, Debbi, you do know it was the Free French … ?